Tag Archives: green

Vibrant Green and Indigo Tsutsugaki

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I recently found this beautiful 19th century indigo dyed fabric that was more than likely used as a furniture cover. These were traditionally made for a wedding and often display the brides family crest. The hand spun cotton thread lends texture to the fabric. The design was worked using a rice paste resist and a method known as tsutsugaki. The light blue of the family crest is known as kame nozoki, or peeking in the vat. The fabric was first dyed with a yellow dye and later over dyed with indigo to create the beautiful green color. In the close up photos you can see the yellow dye that seeped under the resist paste. The last photo shows one of the corners where the yellow dye is also visible. I would guess that the yellow was obtained from gardenia seed pods.

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Katazome obi

I recently found this late Edo or early Meiji period obi made from hand spun cotton. The obi has been dyed using indigo over dyed with a yellow to create a green color. The pattern was created using a katagami or “stencil” to deposit rice paste onto the fabric before dying. The obi is made from two lengths of fabric sewn together in the middle. I think it was made this way because the person who made it was taking advantage of leftover fabric.

IMG_2255IMG_2251IMG_2252IMG_2253IMG_2254I love this geometric repeat pattern. I think it could really work as a modern textile. I would like to try to reproduce this fabric in the future. The colors that come out in this last photo show off the colors possible when over dying indigo.

Nothing Wasted

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This small tsunobukuro or “horn bag” has been made from leftover fabrics. The outer over dyed indigo green fabric once displayed a family crest of crossed feathers. It was dyed using a process called tsutsugaki. The green color was achieved by being dyed with indigo first and then being over dyed with a yellow dye to create the beautiful blue green background color. The inner fabric is a beautiful deep indigo kusari or “ikat”. Both fabrics are hand spun and hand woven cotton. The outer fabric was more than likely a furoshiki or banner before it was reworked into this bag.IMG_1763

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This bag was more than likely used for caring a lunch box. I love the pattern produced by the reuse of the outer fabric. This bag represents the Japanese value of mottainai or “nothing wasted.” This item can be purchased at:   https://www.etsy.com/listing/115393181/antique-japanese-indigogreen-boro-cotton?ref=shop_home_feat

Indigo green furoshiki

IMG_2027This green hand spun and hand woven furoshiki or carrying cloth was dyed with indigo and then over dyed with a yellow dye to produce a deep green color. Time and use have given this furoshiki a beautiful gradation of colors and a random ware pattern.IMG_2025

The hand spun cotton has a rustic feel. IMG_2026

A wisteria kamon or crest has been applied to the furoshiki using a stencil. Rice paste was pushed through a stencil and allowed to dry before the fabric was dyed. After dying was completed the rice paste was washed off to reveal the design. IMG_2024This piece probably dates to the first half of the 20th century.